History of interracial dating marriage

In order to evade Virginia’s Racial Integrity Act, the pair had traveled to Washington, D. In 1963, they approached the American Civil Liberties Union to fight their case in court.

After an extensive legal battle, the Supreme Court ruled that laws prohibiting interracial marriage were unconstitutional in June of 1967.

While attending law school in England, Ruth met Sir Seretse Khama (then Prince Seretse Khama), the chief of the Bamangwato tribe, who became Botswana's first president in 1966.

To add insult to injury, they were told that they had to leave the state for a minimum of nine years in order to avoid prosecution and imprisonment.

The reason was because those people worshipped idols, not because of race; the Hebrews, Amorites, Canaanites, etc. The apostle Paul encouraged Christians not to marry unbelievers (2 Corinthians ), but here again, the reason was religious, not racial.

Jesus and His apostles taught that we must respect and show compassion for all people of God's creation without regard to artificial distinctions like race and nationality.

At that time, 24 states across the country had laws strictly prohibiting marriage between people of different races.

Five weeks earlier, the longtime couple had learned Mildred was pregnant and decided to wed in defiance of the law. Upon their return to Virginia, they were arrested and found guilty, with the judge informing Mildred that “as long as you live you will be known as a felon.” The Lovings moved to the relative safety of Washington, but longed to return to their home state.

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