Relative dating principle

These processes result in All of these processes confuse the stratigraphic record.

In many cases, however, it is possible to reconstruct the original sequence of strata so that they can be used for relative dating.

Superposition in archaeology and especially in stratification use during excavation is slightly different as the processes involved in laying down archaeological strata are somewhat different from geological processes.

Man made intrusions and activity in the archaeological record need not form chronologically from top to bottom or be deformed from the horizontal as natural strata are by equivalent processes.

The rule also applies to other surface-deposited materials such as lava flows and volcanic ashes.

Some knowledge of Earth history and geologic time is also required for engineers in order to understand relationships between geologic units and their impact on engineering construction.The law of superposition is an axiom that forms one of the bases of the sciences of geology, archaeology, and other fields dealing with geological stratigraphy.In its plainest form, it states that in undeformed stratigraphic sequences, the oldest strata will be at the bottom of the sequence.For instance, if we find a fossil bone below the strata 3 rock level shown above, we assume that the animal most likely lived at a time before that layer was formed.However, we must be careful to note whether or not the fossil comes from the mixed strata zone of the filled in hole..

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