Teen dating violence curriculum for police

Violence between dating partners represents a significant public health problem. Victims face the threat of injury and also an elevated risk of substance abuse, poor health, sexually risky behavior, pregnancy, and suicide. teens report dating someone who became violent with them.Many victims of domestic violence, too, are young women.Experts believe that violence between dating teens is severely underreported.Strategy Educating teens about abusive relationships helps prevent teen dating violence.Community Problem Addressed In dating situations, youth test their concepts of masculinity, femininity, respect, mutuality, and communication.In Teen Dating Violence relationships, there are Three Important Roles: Obtaining a Protection Order If someone has physically abused, sexually abused, attempted or threatened to physically abuse, stalked and/or unlawfully held another person against his/her will, a protection order may be obtained for the victim's safety.

teen dating violence curriculum for police-8

Links to the following guidelines and resources can help districts that have not yet met the requirements.

The study evaluated “Ending Violence,” a three-class-session prevention program.

Developed by a Los Angeles-based nonprofit group called Break the Cycle, the program focuses on the law, highlighting legal rights of victims of domestic violence and legal responsibilities of perpetrators. This program has three distinctive features: it is brief (three class sessions), it is compatible with existing health curricula, and it focuses on the legal dimension of dating violence. The program also informs students about its legal services program, in which attorneys are available to teens at no cost to help them with dating violence issues.

Many programs also create hotlines through which teens can report abuse or seek assistance.

Key Partnerships Usually operated through a partnership with a group that assists victims of domestic violence or an agency that serves youth, the school-based programs rely on trained youth who counsel peers, operate hotlines, and deliver curriculum lessons in the classroom.

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